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April 2007


FEATURES

Clean Design

(Page 3 of 4)

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To avoid trapping dust and dander, the designer uses rugs sparingly and finds alternatives: one floor was painted and another inset with colorful glass tiles. Where she did install floor coverings, she chose Earthweave area rugs fashioned from chemical-free wool. "Dyes have chemicals in them, so it can be hard to add color in low-toxic homes," says Dujardin. "To add pattern and interest to the Earthwave rugs, which are neural in color, I combined them by bordering one with another."

Dujardin custom ordered some of the case goods and upholstery because new furniture often contains formaldehyde in its finishes, interior particleboard and foam. In the living room and den, she used non-treated natural fabrics such as organic linen and silk chenille fabrics from J. Robert Scott, who also made the upholstered pieces. The case goods came from Manhattan's John Boone. "I can't live without the high-end stuff," she says. She also installed a few antiques despite not knowing all of their finishes because their age has allowed a sufficient period of outgassing, or evaporation of potentially hazardous chemicals.

Dujardin's bedrooms are always the cleanest spaces in the house. "When you sleep, the liver works to detoxify he body," she says. "It's important to make those rooms the least toxic." She uses mattresses made of pure wool encased in organic cotton and devoid of chemicals and fire retardants.

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