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August 2006


EDITOR'S LETTER

Diving In

Foie gras from the Hudson Valley, wine from Bordeaux and oysters from Norwalk? Believe it.

Years ago, this precious bivalve was harvested in huge quantities not far from the thriving SoNo social scene, and it was an eagerly anticipated item on menus near and far—especially the Oyster Bar at Grand Central. Yes, oysters from Long Island Sound were an important product, as were lobsters from Clinton and fish from the Stonington docks. While some of these succulent sea creatures are finally coming back in large numbers, it wasn't always so. For too many years, the waters of Long Island Sound—as well as many inland rivers and lakes—were neglected, and Connecticut's most precious natural resources were abused. Today, through the efforts of many people and organizations, our waters are on the mend.

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Water. Stop and think about it for a minute, because most of the time we don't. We drink it, dig wells for it, buy it in bottles, deionize it, chlorinate it. We pay a premium to live near it, and pay even more to join clubs to have access to it, yet it seems we take it for granted. We complain about it: It rains too much; it flooded my basement; the tomato plants are yellow because you applied to much if it. But can you imagine Connecticut without water?

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