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August 2006


ANTIQUES

Take It Outside

(Page 3 of 3)

A pair of 19th-century American marble finials catches Coen's eye on the way in. "You need something at the end of a lap pool to anchor it and create symmetry," she says. "These would be perfect." Coen appreciates the finials' patina. "They look almost white," she says. "They are classic in form, but their coloration gives them a clean, updated look."

Coen next stops at a 1920s cast stone urn atop a pedestal. "I like the classic form and coloration," she says. "Placing a pair at the beginning of a slate garden path would look beautiful." An alternative is to fill an urn with stainless steel balls and place it at the center of an English garden. "The balls would reflect the hedges and boxwoods and look so pretty," says Coen. "I also like the juxtaposition of the vintage stone and the shiny new steel. Old and new together create powerful visual interest."

A late-19th-century marble garden bench is the final item Coen uncovers on the trip. "Its legs are simply designed; they look like two spades," she says. "It's traditional without being too busy." Coen says she would place it in a spot where it would become a destination. This could be a special place in a garden, such as a shady spot overlooking a koi pond, or perhaps on the highest point of a property with a gorgeous view. By the sleek look of the bench, either setting would indeed be a perfect fit. (Pickets, 1894 Bronson Rd., Fairfield, 203-254-0012)

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