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July/August 2010


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INNOVATION IN DESIGN AWARDS 2010
 

Winner – ARCHITECTURE

[Winner ARCHITECTURE]

by Mindy Pantiel

Click on any photo for a larger gallery view.

JOEB
MOORE
 
JOEB MOORE
+ PARTNERS
ARCHITECTURE

 

CLASSIC FARMHOUSE GEOMETRY GETS REARRANGED AROUND A SEE-THROUGH CENTRAL STAIR THAT TIES ARCHITECTURE AND NATURE TOGETHER. THE RESULT IS A MODERN HOME THAT REMEMBERS ITS CONNECTICUT ROOTS.

ARCHITECT JOEB MOORE HAS BUILT a reputation on his ability to take historic forms and references and give them an innovative twist—like sheathing an iconic gable in horizontal cedar lattice. "I drew inspiration from a very simple farmhouse form," says Moore of the Greenwich home he designed for a family of six. But instead of one imposing seven-bedroom, six-bathroom building, he broke the house into three structures and used his version of the gable-front façade to conceal the scale of the house beyond it.

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BOX IT UP (click image for larger view)

Inside, the open floor plan was conceived with modern family life in mind. A formal living and dining room reserved for entertaining and big family functions reside in one section—the master suite is above it, and a mudroom, kitchen and family room for everyday goings-on are housed in another. The four offspring reside above the latter, and the entire lower level—a sumptuous 4,000 square feet—houses a multi-functional game room that has its own access to the infinity pool.

 
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At the core, a glass-enclosed central staircase—a nod to Connecticut's center-hall Colonials—not only connects all three levels of the interiors, but it also bridges the gap between the manmade and the natural. "It's where the architecture and the landscape merge," says Moore, noting the views to the water canal, waterfall and surrounding greenery. "It is literally the crux of the building and the heart of the house."

[Image]
CULINARY CENTER (click image for larger view)



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