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July/August 2010


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INNOVATION IN DESIGN AWARDS 2010
 

ARCHITECTURE – Innovator 2

[ARCHITECTURE Innovator 2]

by Mindy Pantiel

Click on any photo for a larger gallery view.

IRA
GRANDBERG
 
GRANDBERG &
ASSOCIATES

 

RESPECTING THE ORIGINAL CHARACTER AND MATERIALS OF AN OLD STONE COTTAGE IN WESTPORT, ARCHITECT IRA GRANDBERG DESIGNED A SEAMLESS RENOVATION ON THE OUTSIDE WITH A 21ST-CENTURY FLOOR PLAN ON THE INSIDE.

MORE THAN TRIPLING THE SIZE of a venerable stone cottage built in the 1920s by noted New York City architect Walter Bradnee Kirby required an eye for detail and a reverence for the past. Architect Ira Grandberg had both. "My intent was to create a seamless addition that didn't overrun the existing scale and maintained the original cottage feel," says Grandberg, who painstakingly matched everything from the stone and mortar to the windows, hand-cast chimney pots and antique Ludowici roof tiles.

 
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The architect, who collaborated with interior designer Ann Marie Barton from Salt Lake City, was also meticulous about the interior elements, introducing trusses and beams in various sizes to provide scale and detail. "Timbers make a very strong visual statement and there are also timber braces on the outside," says Grandberg, who introduced antique oak floors as another unifying element. "We used various patterns like herringbone and chevrons to delineate the rooms."

 
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Grandberg also ensured the new square footage met the needs of his clients and their three teenage children. "My job was to establish a contemporary lifestyle within an antique shell," he says. To that end, the internal circulation was completely reorganized and interaction between new rooms like the kitchen, family room, sleeping quarters and recreation area with the landscape was maximized. "We decided what views each room would have and molded the room to that view," says Grandberg. "Throughout the structure there are visual focal points, both natural and architectural, that draw you through the house."



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