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February 2008


REAL ESTATE

Deeds & Don'ts

(Page 4 of 8)

The owner, Christine Ross, has been described in the press as an architect who wants to build a big new house on the property while converting the smaller Johnson building into a pool or guesthouse. When a town commission turned down that application, Ross reported that her only alternative was to demolish the Ball House and build the new one on its site. If she's successful, Ross will hold the dubious distinction of becoming the first person to demolish a house designed by Philip Johnson. Yet a possibly happier ending has emerged: Ross has also put the home on the market for $3.1 million—a steep price for a 1,775—square–foot house, no matter its pedigree—double the price she paid for it just two years ago. It's listed with Prudy Parris of William Pitt Sotheby's International Realty in New Canaan (203–966–2633).

The Alice Ball House tops the list of historically significant "endangered" structures posted by the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation (www.cttrust.org). Also in danger of demolition are two historic barns in Milford. The oldest of the two is described as an "English barn with hand–hewn, square–rule–constructed posts and beams, measuring 12–by–30 feet" and the other is a New England barn measuring 30–by–45 feet. They're offered for $1 with the stipulation that the structures must be removed from the property. Interested? Call CT Trust's Todd Levine at 203–562–6312.

In Redding, a circa–1795 white clapboard structure called the Heritage House has been put on the market by the town in hopes of converting what was once a senior center into a family home. The town paid to clean up and repaint the two–story, four–bedroom home that sits near the town green in the Redding Center Historic District. There are wide plank floors in many rooms, a large fireplace with beehive oven and an historic barn with board–and–batten siding located behind the house. It's listed for $450,000; inquiries are directed to the office of the First Selectman (203–938–2002). —L.O.

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