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July 2007


REAL ESTATE

Deeds & Don'ts

(Page 4 of 8)

The home now offers six bedrooms, five full bathrooms and two kitchens. This time of year, the most stylish moments occur outdoors: The two-acre property features a glorious pool, a meadow of wildflowers and the stone remains of a dwelling used to barrack Revolutionary War soldiers (or so the story goes), where the Lawrences set up tables for candlelit, al fresco dining. Block House is offered by Terry Beaurline of Coldwell Banker in Greenwich (203-536-1675).

Barbara Garfield, Rowayton
Featured in this column last year, the Barbara Garfield story is worth repeating. In search of a new profession after a divorce and the prospect of her four children growing up and moving out, Garfield took a parcel of Rowayton land and built a handful of diminutive (by Fairfield County standards) homes, keeping one for herself.

Today, Garfield has doubled the number of dwellings she has developed in Rowayton, encouraged by the fact that there are people who like a "small, good thing," to quote Raymond Carver. And now she is selling the two-bedroom, two-bathroom, 1,800-square-foot house she currently calls home, along with an adjacent circa-1810 barn that was moved from New Hampshire and transformed into another stylish house with an additional 1,460 square feet, including two bedrooms and two bathrooms. Together, the house and barn, each with their own lap pools equipped with swim-against-the-current jets, are listed for just shy of $4 million. And although the distinctive structures hew to Garfield's anti-mansion mandate, they feel generously proportioned, even lofty, inside. The main house, for instance, features oversized, barn-board doors and—instead of curtains—antique shutters on the large windows. The ceilings soar, the walls are made of thick plaster, the floors of salvaged wood the color of driftwood, and the fine, white marble in the bathrooms is hefty and luxe. The barn has fixtures culled from French antiques markets, including a 10-by-9-foot window from a chateau that is used as a room divider and doors from a fin-de-siecle Parisian apartment.

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