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March 2008


FEATURES

Master Class

(Page 2 of 4)

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Layered lighting is best achieved by using more than one light source and a mixture of lighting types. Let's examines the [a few] categories of lighting by defining them and evaluating their pros and cons.

Flush-Mounted Lights
These fixtures attach directly to the ceiling without a stem or a chain. They usually have a smooth, rubbed or etched-glass cover, often with a metal detailing and trim. Flush lights are fairly small, usually measuring 12 or 15 inches in diameter. Their low profile makes them a good choice for rooms with low ceilings or spaces lacking adequate overhead clearance. Use them in bathrooms, small hallways, walk-in closets and playrooms, and as supplementary kitchen lighting. Because of their size, they do not hold much wattage, nor do the give off much light. Therefore, you will probably want to use more than one unless the space is exceptionally small, as in a walk-in closet or a powder room.

Chandeliers
This type of suspended light is characterized by multiple arms, each of which supports a bulb, which may be bare or covered by a small shade. Chandeliers usually hang alone and are the centerpiece of many dining rooms, breakfast nooks, libraries and bedrooms, where they will be the main light source. Two words of advice when choosing chandeliers: First, pay attention to the weight of the piece and whether or not you may need to reinforce the ceiling where it is mounted, and second, be sure to specify a dimmer at the light switch.

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