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May 2006


EDITOR'S LETTER

Object Lessons

Have you ever noticed that what we love today is often forgotten tomorrow? Remember how you couldn't live without a power suit in the '80s? Today, most of us wouldn't be caught dead with shoulder pads! Who still uses that pasta machine you thought was indispensable a few years ago? And didn't you have at least one room covered in chintz on chintz on chintz? Very few things in life continue to delight us for generations, but there are a few items that have withstood the test of time.

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Recently, I had the chance to visit a circular home built on a stem that gives the whole structure a mushroom-like appearance. With a 360-degree view of Wilton's rolling hills, this radical 1968 house designed by Richard Foster cast a spell over me. More than 35 years after it was built, the house hasn't lost any of its special quality, and days after my visit I was still in awe of this unique structure. That got me thinking about the world of design and what objects or structures still affect me as powerfully as the so-called Round House. To this day I never tire of Gerrit Rietveld's Red/Blue chair. I love its sharp, clean lines and dramatic use of color. I'm also a big fan of Noguchi table lamps for their free-form sculptural quality. But why?

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