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October 2006


FEATURES

Opposites Attract

(Page 3 of 4)

Ring would figure out how to go Goth later. First, he had the idea to tear down all the walls on the older section's ground floor, revealing a fireplace at the center of the house and creating one large living area. "Suddenly, what had been four small rooms became something quite dramatic," he explains.

"Before, the low ceilings had made B.A. feel claustrophobic," Kevin says, "but now you had all this space you could be Zen in."

Ring installed wide-beam, antique chestnut floors and began to sort through the couple's collection of art and antiques. "The challenge was to cherry-pick their incredible finds from around the world, but not make the interiors look like a garage sale."

During this process, Kevin and B.A. vacationed in Virginia, touring mansions of the same vintage as their house, Monticello being one of them. To their surprise, a color palette they'd considered distinctly modern had a precedent in the antebellum era.

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"Monticello has this room that is a really, really loud green," Stanley says, still sounding a bit shocked. Inspired by what they'd seen, the couple allowed a wealth of color to infuse their home—with yellow and green in the kitchen, for instance, a master bedroom decorated in deep red and all the woodwork throughout painted a "cadet" blue. Even Emily's request was granted, to a point: Her room has several black pieces.

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